IIEC Knowledge Products

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At a Glance:

This century has reached a critical juncture in energy use and climate change. As the planet’s average temperature rises, the frequency and scale of extreme weather events increases, and non-renewable resources become increasingly scarce, the importance of changing international energy trends has never been so clear. IIEC is committed to bringing about major change in the types and sources of energy we use. Renewable Energy (RE) provides an opportunity to deliver clean energy at a low cost, while reducing the emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs). IIEC has a long history of success and demonstrated expertise in implementing RE projects, and bringing these resources to scale.

Our Experience:

RE applications in developing countries are mainly off-grid or rural electrification. IIEC has implemented projects on solar photovoltaic, biomass and biodiesel for power production in Cambodia, India and the Philippines. Thermal power from renewable sources can often be cost competitive with fossil fuel in industrial process. We have been helping to guide the industrial transition to solar thermal and biogas from industrial waste in food and beverage industry in India and Thailand. Our expertise ranges from policy planning, project feasibility study, technical and financial assessment, to innovative financing schemes for RE projects. Read more...

The Challenge:

The complex issues facing our global energy landscape require dynamic solutions. Although recent decades have seen major advances in research and development in the field of clean and Renewable Energy (RE), we are now faced with the challenge of integrating and mainstreaming these opportunities into the international market. Lack of funding to develop enabling policies, raise awareness and address knowledge gaps creates barriers to RE project implementation in developing countries. With knowledge and experience in mapping RE projects, policies and funding mechanisms, IIEC is at the forefront of helping create a sustainable energy future.

IIEC’s experience in this key activity, categorized by country is listed below:

 

IIEC’s experience in this service area, categorized by country is listed below:

IIEC’s experience in this service area, categorized by country is listed below:

At a Glance:

IIEC designs innovative financing mechanisms and provides capacity building in project financing to facilitate access to finance for Energy Efficiency (EE) and Renewable Energy (RE) projects. We seek to identify and promote financing opportunities for employing technologies and initiatives to mitigate carbon emissions. Our programs foster growth in clean energy markets by developing financing solutions, identifying economic opportunities, reducing perceived investment risks, and connecting stakeholders across sectors in order to build environmentally sound financial partnerships.

Our Experience:

Our programs address all stages of project finance – from identifying appropriate funding mechanisms to capacity building on clean energy project finance for stakeholders on both the supply and demand sides. We work with financial institutions, entrepreneurs, project developers, governments, and Energy Service Companies (ESCOs) to build investment potential and ensure both monetary and environmental returns. This involves helping institutions assess the financial viability of clean energy programs, and designing financial models to suite programmatic needs.

The Challenge:

The Energy Efficiency (EE) and Renewable Energy (RE) technologies and practices needed to develop the global clean energy market exist, but must be implemented on a massive scale in order to address growing energy demand and achieve significant greenhouse gas emission reductions. This will require the financial commitment of stakeholders in both the public and private sectors to galvanize change in the ways we use and produce energy. Although such changes provide tremendous financial opportunities for stakeholders at all levels, the current lack of knowledge, the need for suitable financial products, and the barriers to making initial investments are significant constraints to scaling and implementing clean energy solutions. IIEC uses our extensive knowledge of clean energy finance to address these financial barriers and increase access to capital through development of innovative financing policies and mechanisms.

IIEC’s experience in this key activity, categorized by country is listed below:


At a Glance:

In order to bring good energy policy into practice and raise its profile in international dialogue, IIEC develops strategic communication and outreach plans to raise public awareness of Energy Efficiency (EE) and Renewable Energy (RE) as well as to stimulate stakeholder participation, education and engagement in sustainable energy. IIEC provides assistance in planning and designing promotional materials and programs, including event management in Asian countries such as Cambodia, China, India, Lao PDR, the Philippines, and Thailand. IIEC manages and maintains information-sharing plat- forms to provide a dynamic and robust mechanism for disseminating research efforts and knowledge to the broader community.

Our Experience:

To promote awareness, IIEC facilitates replication and mainstreaming of successful projects by compiling lessons learned and disseminating program knowledge and best practice methods to leaders and consumers alike. IIEC crystallizes data and program experience by developing and maintaining comprehensive implementation manuals, websites, databases, social media, advertising (print, online, radio, or television commercial), marketing collaterals (brochures and case studies), events (workshop proceedings), and trade shows; this allows us to bridge the gap between global knowledge and local action. We integrate web-based applications and databases for supporting online promotional and educational activities, which have become an essential tool in the communication and marketing environment.

The Challenge:

A lack of comprehensive knowledge management resources – such as project databases, networks and implementation guides – creates significant barriers to scaling and replicating successful clean energy programs. At the same time, lack of consumer knowledge impedes adoption of energy efficient practices and technologies. In spite of the large volume of global pilot projects, many policy makers lack the technical capacity to design, implement and extend successful Energy Efficiency (EE) and Renewable Energy (RE) programs. The lack of consolidated project information makes it difficult for leaders to learn from and improve upon past projects. Failure to consolidate and distribute lessons learned across regions and sectors represents a significant constraint to international progress in clean energy and climate change mitigation efforts. Creating mechanisms to communicate and reach out to key stakeholders, intermediary organizations, and the public is therefore a key challenge.

IIEC’s experience in this key activity, categorized by country is listed below:

At a Glance:

IIEC enables sharing of knowledge and best practices across countries, and facilitates the mainstreaming of successful energy policies and projects. We accomplish this through our focus on local needs and delivery of training and capacity building programs customized to suit local contexts. The core objective of our training and capacity building programs is to ensure that stakeholders can implement energy related policies and activities in a sustainable manner.

Our Experience:

IIEC’s training and capacity building programs are developed through a comprehensive process. In each program, we assess specific needs and address them by using customized training tools, materials, and training approaches. Quantitative and qualitative market surveys and in-depth analyses are the core elements in our capacity building needs assessment exercises, which help IIEC define the capacity building requirements of the recipients. International experience and lessons learned are seamlessly integrated into our customized training tools and materials.

The Challenge:

Lack of knowledge and appropriate skills to identify and address the needs in clean energy development is common among policy makers, regulators, financiers, and private sectors in developing countries and economies in transition. These barriers have hampered greater adoption of clean energy policies and projects by policy makers and stakeholders. Often, even successful Energy Efficiency (EE) and Renewable Energy (RE) projects cannot be replicated due to a lack of market-supporting conditions, such as limited knowledge within financial institutions about financing such projects. The limited capacity of local technology suppliers and installers is another barrier to development and scaling up of clean energy projects.

IIEC’s experience in this key activity, categorized by country is listed below:


At a Glance:

Human consumption of water, food, and energy directly and indirectly affects the ecosystems and natural resources on which society depends for its survival. Rising energy and food prices, and crisis events such as droughts, increasingly demonstrate the dangers of managing water, energy, and food systems in isolation. IIEC has contributed to several initiatives that integrate energy and these other critical areas to ensure a balanced approach to development.

Our Experience:

Water, energy and food security can be achieved through a nexus approach – integrating management and governance across sectors and scales. Such an approach can support the transition to a green economy, which aims, among other things, at resource use efficiency and greater policy coherence.

The Challenge:

Exacerbated by rapidly accelerating urban development, huge challenges face developing countries in terms of water, energy, and food security. These three systems intersect in numerous ways:

  • Energy is required to treat wastewater and transport water for drinking, agriculture, and commercial/industrial uses, as well as to power pumps and other equipment used to grow food.
  • Water is needed to grow food, sustain communities, produce electricity, and manufacture products.
  • Certain crops are increasingly used to produce energy.
  • Water quality can be adversely affected by food and energy production.

Scarcities of all three are exacerbated by policies developed to govern the management of one resource, without consideration of the impacts on the others. These inter-linkages point to a critical need for co-management of the three resources.

IIEC’s experience in this key activity, categorized by country is listed below:

At present IIEC has a limited selection of publications available on-line. Follow the links download the full text in portable document format (PDF). To read the PDF files, you will require the free Adobe Acrobat Reader.

At a Glance:

Given the rapidly accelerating pace of urban development in emerging economies and the resulting climatic and environmental impacts, IIEC is committed to providing ongoing advice and expertise to government stakeholders and the private sector on resource use, energy efficient buildings, sustainable construction practices, and healthy and productive indoor environments.

Our Experience:

When implementing sustainable urban development projects, IIEC’s primary focus is to provide new technological solutions for energy efficient housing and other buildings, as well as public lighting systems and other urban services. We are doing so by building the capacity of local institutions and forming strategic local and international partnerships. We assess the innovative use of materials, scale up proven technologies, and use new business models and contemporary practices to adopt integrated design solutions. IIEC has successfully carried out green and energy efficient building projects in residential, commercial, public, and industrial sectors in India, Malawi, the Philippines, South Africa, Sri Lanka, and the Pacific Islands.

The Challenge:

More than half of the current global population lives in urban areas, and almost all new population growth is expected to occur in cities. The speed and scale of urban population expansion represents enormous challenges in terms of meeting the growing demand for energy services; but also presents a range of opportunities for addressing energy use, mitigating global Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions, and improving living standards. Our goal is to design and implement effective sustainable projects that help reduce GHG emissions, energy use and costs, as well as to improve the overall quality of life of urban populations.

IIEC’s experience in this key activity, categorized by country is listed below:

IIEC’s experience in this service area, categorized by country is listed below:

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At a Glance:

IIEC is at the forefront of planning and implementing global Energy Efficiency (EE) and Demand-Side Management (DSM) programs. Our recent experience extends to Asia, Africa and the Pacific Islands and includes EE and DSM policies, program design, implementation, and Measurement and Verification (M&V). The projects we implement deliver significant amounts of verifiable energy and demand savings that have been acknowledged by host agencies and funders.

Our Experience:

We take a comprehensive approach to implementing EE and DSM projects. Our experts start with focused load research and detailed energy audits, allowing them to identify opportunities, technology options and proper baselines for verifying program impacts. The implementation phase includes procuring equipment that meets the highest international standards while remaining adaptable to local conditions. Our M&V procedures conform to those followed by the International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol (IPMVP) and the United Nations Framework Convention for Climate Change (UNFCCC). Through this approach, we develop implementation models that can be used for large-scale replication both nationwide and in other countries.

The Challenge:

Lack of generation capacity is extremely common in developing countries, particularly in Asia and Africa. This hinders economic development due to inadequate and unreliable power supply. Providing affordable and reliable energy is a key challenge for most electric utilities, and Energy Efficiency (EE) and Demand-Side Management (DSM) techniques are key solutions for addressing this challenge. Even though it has been proven that saving 1MW of demand through EE measures is more cost effective than installing 1MW of generation capacity, demand savings take a longer time to achieve. In order to address these issues, we have developed a number of implementation models that produce EE and DSM out- comes with a short lead-time.

IIEC’s experience in this key activity, categorized by country is listed below:

At a Glance:

IIEC works collaboratively with national, local and community level partners in developing countries to provide robust models, policies and action plans for effective and sustainable implementation of clean energy technologies and services to improve the lives of rural communities. We integrate Renewable Energy (RE) technology into rural electrification markets in Asia, Africa and the Pacific Islands.
Our work in this sector consists of feasibility studies, market assessment and development, policy research and comparative assessment of relevant technologies. IIEC’s projects focus on addressing knowledge gaps, and linking energy access to social development goals through policy assessments, framework development, design of knowledge materials, and training and capacity building of relevant stakeholders. We address the problem of low access to electricity in rural areas and insufficient capacity on the grid through installation of appropriate technologies for rural households.

Our Experience:

IIEC provides support to both public and private sector stakeholders in developing countries in order to enhance rural and peri-urban electrification planning, project development, and implementation. We design rural electrification programs that promote Energy Efficiency (EE), and support a livelihood based and a gender focused approach to energy access.

The Challenge:

Expanding the coverage of the grid electricity service and improving its quality pose formidable challenges, many of which are common to rural areas across developing countries. Addressing these challenges requires a comprehensive approach through effective rural electrification strategies and programs.
Rural areas are characterized by low population density and typically have a significant number of low-income households. The average household’s demand for electricity is low and generally peaks in the evening. Electricity distribution costs must also be spread among relatively few people, resulting in high costs for each unit of electricity consumed and high grid expansion costs. As a result, many poor households in rural and peri-urban areas thus have no access to the grid, which impacts their livelihoods.
Demand for electricity normally matures slowly as consumers invest in appliances, and make the switch from other fuels for their lighting and cooking. Designing and implementing rural electrification projects with a focus on clean and efficient technologies presents a key opportunity to minimize the costs and environmental impacts of the projects, and to maximize the financial and socio-economic benefits to a community or region. In order to increase access to clean, reliable energy for consumers of all kinds, we promote efficient grid connections and support off-grid Renewable Energy (RE) technologies.

IIEC’s experience in this key activity, categorized by country is listed below:


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IIEC Knowledge Products