IIEC Knowledge Products

iiec name

Bloomberg New Energy Finance (Zindler and Locklin, 2016) has estimated that investment in new renewable electric power1 over the next 25 years will need to almost double—to over $12 trillion—if we are to limit global warming to two degrees Celsius (2oC). The needed commercial clean energy technologies (renewables + energy efficiency) and investment capital to accommodate this growth already exist, but an enormous shift will be needed, from less than half of global low carbon energy investments flowing to non-OECD countries to over 70 percent of a greatly expanded volume of investments going to these developing and emerging economies. 
 
Achieving a 2oC future will therefore require a more than five-fold increase in annual clean energy investment in non-OECD nations. This unprecedented shift can only be accomplished by accelerating the access of project developers in emerging markets to the substantial financial resources of OECD-based capital pools—more efficiently moving capital from where it is to where it is needed.

“... navigating the transition already underway from predominantly OECD-led growth to non-OECD driven market expansion will create new needs and opportunities for investment support and risk mitigation. Multilateral development banks and other public funding resources will have an expanding role to play in arbitraging risks and facilitating capital flows. … Facilitating this transition demands continued market development support for these rapidly growing markets by public funders.”

BNEF “Mapping the Gap”, January 2016

In addition, the providers of investment capital will need information and guidance on the infrastructure investment opportunities that will be expanding in non-OECD markets at an accelerating pace.
 
Fortunately for global capital investors and for emerging market infrastructure developers, substantial experience has been gained over the last two decades in structuring successful, scalable investment for the clean energy sector in non-OECD markets. A history of project- and program-level successes recorded by multilateral banks, development finance agencies, and multilateral development banks can provide the models to help us navigate this uncharted sea of needed growth. Successful models to accelerate the required cash inflows exist, and with thoughtful adaptation and reliable information resources and support, they can be replicated and expanded.
 
The Clean Energy Global Finance Initiative (CEGFI) will provide important, real-time informational inputs to both the providers and users of clean energy finance in developing and emerging economies. By combining a continuously updated source of information about investment opportunities and details on available financing with expert policy analysis and recommendations, the CEGFI will help prepare the ground for the necessary upswing in developing country clean energy investment.
 
Managed by the International Institute for Energy Conservation (IIEC) and led by a high-level team of financial experts with support from a seasoned Policy Advisory Committee, the CEGFI will provide public sector entities—e.g., multilateral development banks (MDBs), international financial institutions (IFIs), development finance institutions (DFIs)—and their private and independent sector funder counterparts with a range of free information and resources. It will:
 

1 Provide a free, easy to access database of public and private funding and financing sources for clean energy investments in developing countriesstarting with Asia, Africa, and the Pacific Islands;

 

2 Regularly highlight new funding sources and financing initiatives through social and other media;  

 

3 Curate examples of clean energy finance programmatic and policy successes from emerging markets worldwide;

 

4 Showcase live examples, including smaller but eminently scalable programs;

 

5 Translate this new information into specific program design suggestions and policy recommendationsidentifying existing funding gaps and highlighting promising new trends and opportunities. These periodic policy pronouncements will be formulated with the support of a Policy Advisory Committee comprising senior financial experts. 

 
The CEGFI will function as a multinational, cross-institutional toolkit, supporting the interests and priorities of the MDBs and other multi- and bilateral public and private funders—helping them to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of their clean energy finance missions. As the interest in clean energy investment opportunities expands rapidly in the coming years, components of the CEGFI are expected to become self-sustaining—e.g., through subscriptions for more focused support services.
 

Expected outcomes of the initiative include: 

Developers will be able to identify available funding/financing sources for clean energy projects in specific countries.

 

Public and private financiers will receive periodic analysis on existing gaps in the market, by location, thereby prompting financing responses

Up-to-date information on MDB/bilateral financing products and guarantees, as well as on new private bank, investment bank and commercial bank offerings will be available in a free and centrally available database.

 

The entrance of developers in traditionally riskprone markets will be encouraged, based on the availability of financing supports and funding.

“The good news is that technological innovation and evolution mean that we can think of providing people with access to clean and affordable energy for much less power than was the case before. We can imagine that we can front-load the long-term goal of access as part of our energy transition. The not so good news: moving everyone at the same pace of achievement has eluded us to date. The financing and policy environment that will support smart behaviors—now necessary change—needs to catch up with our newly realised urgency.”

Rachel Kyte, Accelerating Energy Efficiency under SE4All, February 2016

 

The BNEF Mapping the Gap analysis process reinforced the need for urgency in accelerating investment in climate solutions. By tracking current and emerging financing and funding instruments available in Asia, Africa and the Pacific Islands—and providing important analysis regarding what is needed in the market in order to accelerate clean energy financing and implementation—the CEGFI is designed to facilitate that journey.

 
 

 

CEGFI Program Elements

Current analysis estimates that we will need at least a five-fold increase in clean energy investment in developing and emerging markets over the next 20-25 years to avoid a > 2oC temperature increase. Much of this capital will need to flow from private financing vehicles that have yet to be fully developed or implemented. Some will only become available as new and innovative commercial financing structures and products can be deployed; these may in turn depend on enhanced public support for key markets in transition.

The goal of the CEGFI database is to accelerate investment flows and enable the needed exponential increase in clean energy investment, by more effectively matching investors with potential support, and helping policy makers and investors efficiently identify and resolve impediments to clean energy financial flows. 

CEGFI Database

The CEGFI database will provide an easily accessible, fully searchable and continuously updated resource that lists all identified public and—to the extent possible—private funding and financing sources for renewable energy and energy efficiency investment in Asia, Africa and the Pacific Islands. The database will contain information compiled on an ongoing basis from:

Local, regional and international development banks;

 National, bilateral and international investment support entities and clean energy financing programs;

 Foundation-supported development finance programs;

 Emerging private industry and financing initiatives; and

 Key information outlets covering new initiatives in local markets (in collaboration with Bloomberg New Energy Finance).

The database system, maintained by CEGFI and the International Institute for Energy Conservation, will be fully searchable and sortable— by country, funder, technology, type of financing vehicle, date of availability, etc. The database will:

 Aggregate information: The comprehensive data set will help in-country developers identify funding and financing sources for local projects, and will enable external developers to survey resources available to fund clean energy projects across national markets.

 Highlight new resources: Advanced database features will draw attention to new and expanded public financing products and guarantees, as well as emerging private bank, investment bank and commercial finance offerings.

 Identify gaps: The database sorting functions will enable public and private financiers to easily identify financing gaps in individual markets (e.g., specific subsectors, countries or regions), catalyzing the development of effective commercial financing responses or the design of new 3rd party guarantees.

 Promote investment in emerging regions: Enhanced awareness of the availability of financing and risk mitigation tools in emerging regions will encourage developers to enter traditionally high-risk markets.

Given the need for and projected expansion of clean energy investment in emerging markets, the scope of the CEGFI database will grow and evolve over time. The database will track current and emerging financing and funding instruments available in the target regions, and will publicize new offerings when they are announced by funding and financing providers.

 

CEGFI Policy Forum

The CEGFI Policy Forum will be an ongoing policy dialogue supported by a high-level Policy Advisory Committee (PAC). Quarterly Committee meetings will focus serially on a range of cross-cutting topics identified by the members as essential for accelerating clean energy deployment in the CEGFI markets.

Based on the real-time trends identified through the CEGFI database and the deliberations of the PAC, the Forum will deliver financial insights to both the providers and consumers of clean energy finance in the developing world. It will highlight promising clean energy finance developments, identify current structural financing gaps, and provide input on developments needed in the market to accelerate clean energy financing.

Major regional or global challenges to expanded clean energy deployment will be identified by the Committee members and prioritized for discussion. CEGFI staff will research and prepare materials for the Committee, and record its recommendations after each session. In those cases where deliberations highlight the need for further research to inform the Committee’s deliberations, staffsupported working groups will investigate these priority topics in more detail and provide feedback to the PAC.

Discussions of individual national markets will include underlying trends and impediments to accelerated clean energy capital deployment. Committee members and staff will develop recommendations on needs and opportunities for addressing the current financing challenges.

Members of the Policy Advisory Committee are leaders in the field of clean energy finance with years of experience. To date, those who have agreed to serve on the PAC include:

 Thomas Dreessen, President & CEO, EPS Capital, developing and financing ESCO and energy efficiency projects in Indonesia and China; based in Jakarta.

 Benoit Lebot, Executive Director, International Partnership for Energy Efficiency Cooperation (IPEEC), which is implementing the G20 Energy Efficiency Action Plan; based in Paris.

 Dilip Limaye, President & CEO, SRC Global Inc., renowned international energy efficiency finance expert, having completed projects all over the world; based in Philadelphia.

 Peter Sweatman, CEO, Climate Strategy & Partners; Chairman, Energy Efficiency Capital Advisors, working on multiple international EE finance initiatives; based in Madrid.

 Markus van der Burg, Managing Director, Conning Asset Management, EE & RE financier through the $345M European Clean Energy Fund; based in London.

The resulting observations and policy recommendations from the Forum will be widely disseminated through:

 The CEGFI website

 Social media

 Op-eds and by-lined articles

 CEGFI blog posts

 Email blasts to CEGFI stakeholders (e.g., in the Forum’s quarterly reports).

 

CEGFI Builds Value

To accelerate the needed exponential increase in clean energy investment, the CEGFI will provide valuable information and services to all of the key providers and users of clean energy finance in developing and emerging economies.

 

Globally

Catalyze & facilitate increased CE investment; match providers/users of CE finance; help policy makers/investors identify & resolve impediments to CE financial flows.

value proposition

1 New renewable electric power = solar, geothermal, and other of the most modern clean technologies, but not large hydro or nuclear. [back to top]

Cook Islands
9project(s)
- EE in Edgewater Resort & Spa
- EE Street Lighting Project for the Punanga Nui Market
- EE Lighting in Marina and Wharf
- EE Program in Public Buildings
- EE Fridge/Freezer Replacement Program
- Residential EE Lighting Program
- EE Lighting in Rarotonga Airport
- Solar Water Heaters for Rarotonga Hospital
- EE Street Lighting Project in the Outer Islands
Papua New Guinea
5project(s)
- EE Lighting at Papua New Guinea Power Limited (PPL)
- EE Street Lighting Project in Residential Streets of Port Moresby
- EE Street Lighting Project in Residential Streets of Alotau
- EE Lighting for Port Moresby General Hospital
- EE Lighting and Ventilation at Science Faculty Bldg., University of PNG
Samoa
7project(s)
- EE Lighting in Government Buildings
- EE Street Lighting Project in Apia
- EE Luminaires in Government Buildings
- Demonstration of EE Air-Conditioning Technologies
- EE Lighting in the Commercial Sector
- EE Air Conditioning in Hotels
- Residential EE Lighting
Tonga
5project(s)
- EE Street Lighting for Outer Islands
- Residential EE Lighting in the Outer Islands
- EE Lighting in Public Sector Buildings
- Residential EE Lighting in Tongatapu
- EE Street Lighting for Tongatapu
Vanuatu
7project(s)
- Implementation of EE Lighting in Public Sector Bldgs
- Household EE Lighting, Port Vila
- EE Street Lighting Project in Luganville
- EE Street Lighting Project in Port Vila
- Residential EE Lighting, Luganville
- EE Lighting for Provincial, Local Public Sector and School Bldgs.
- EE Air-Conditioning System Using Variable Refrigerant Volume/Flow Technologies
 

 

Our Amazing Projects

Great design comes with understanding our clients needs

image
 

Example Slide

This is dummy text. You can add any text or html markup here.
image
 

Example Slide

This is dummy text. You can add any text or html markup here.
image
 

Example Slide

This is dummy text. You can add any text or html markup here.
 
image
 

Example Slide

This is dummy text. You can add any text or html markup here.
image
 

Example Slide

This is dummy text. You can add any text or html markup here.
image
 

Example Slide

This is dummy text. You can add any text or html markup here.
 
image
 

Example Slide

This is dummy text. You can add any text or html markup here.
image
 

Example Slide

This is dummy text. You can add any text or html markup here.
image
 

Example Slide

This is dummy text. You can add any text or html markup here.
 
image
 

Example Slide

This is dummy text. You can add any text or html markup here.
image
 

Example Slide

This is dummy text. You can add any text or html markup here.
image
 

Example Slide

This is dummy text. You can add any text or html markup here.
 

Under the Pacific Alliance for Sustainability (PAS) program of the Global Environment Facility (GEF), the Asian Development Bank (ADB) provided technical assistance for the “Promoting Energy Efficiency in the Pacific (PEEP)” project. The project was co-financed by the GEF, Government of Australia, Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) and the Asian Clean Energy Fund (under the Clean Energy Financing Partnership Facility).  During the implementation phase (PEEP2) from 2011 to 2015, the International Institute for Energy Conservation (IIEC) established policy and implementation frameworks, developed energy efficiency targets, and implemented a range of energy efficiency (EE) projects in the five participating Pacific Developing Member Countries (PDMCs): PNG, Vanuatu, Tonga, Samoa, and the Cook Islands.  The overall goal of the project was to reduce energy consumption in the residential, commercial and public sectors in order to save energy, reduce fossil fuel imports, and lower greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

Total Investment
US$ million2.68
Cost Savings
US$ million1.51/per year
CO2 Savings
tons3,204/per year
 

 

Under PEEP2, IIEC implemented 34 EE projects following ADB procurement guidelines. Grant funding from the GEF was provided for the procurement of EE equipment, while the installation costs were covered through co-funding from the recipients (e.g., hotels, government agencies). With a total investment of US$ 2,686,637, the project resulted in energy annual savings of 3,377 MWh, annual cost savings of US$1,519,629 and CO2 savings of 3,204 tons/year. The average cost of saved energy across these projects varied from 3 to 11 cents/kWh—extremely cost-effective in comparison with the electricity tariffs in the PDMCs, which range between 29 and 61 cents/kWh.

 

Implementation of 34 Energy Efficiency Projects in PEEP2 Project

Cook Islands
9project(s)
- EE in Edgewater Resort & Spa
- EE Street Lighting Project for the Punanga Nui Market
- EE Lighting in Marina and Wharf
- EE Program in Public Buildings
- EE Fridge/Freezer Replacement Program
- Residential EE Lighting Program
- EE Lighting in Rarotonga Airport
- Solar Water Heaters for Rarotonga Hospital
- EE Street Lighting Project in the Outer Islands
Papua New Guinea
5project(s)
- EE Lighting at Papua New Guinea Power Limited (PPL)
- EE Street Lighting Project in Residential Streets of Port Moresby
- EE Street Lighting Project in Residential Streets of Alotau
- EE Lighting for Port Moresby General Hospital
- EE Lighting and Ventilation at Science Faculty Bldg., University of PNG
Samoa
7project(s)
- EE Lighting in Government Buildings
- EE Street Lighting Project in Apia
- EE Luminaires in Government Buildings
- Demonstration of EE Air-Conditioning Technologies
- EE Lighting in the Commercial Sector
- EE Air Conditioning in Hotels
- Residential EE Lighting
Tonga
5project(s)
- EE Street Lighting for Outer Islands
- Residential EE Lighting in the Outer Islands
- EE Lighting in Public Sector Buildings
- Residential EE Lighting in Tongatapu
- EE Street Lighting for Tongatapu
Vanuatu
7project(s)
- Implementation of EE Lighting in Public Sector Bldgs
- Household EE Lighting, Port Vila
- EE Street Lighting Project in Luganville
- EE Street Lighting Project in Port Vila
- Residential EE Lighting, Luganville
- EE Lighting for Provincial, Local Public Sector and School Bldgs.
- EE Air-Conditioning System Using Variable Refrigerant Volume/Flow Technologies
 

Project outcomes also included:

·         Development of an energy use database to provide access to information on electricity consumption and energy efficiency indicators at national and end-use sector levels. 

·         Development of national EE targets for the five PDMCs based on energy consumption and end-use energy savings projections for three policy scenarios – conservative, moderate and aggressive – for the years 2020, 2025 and 2030.

·         Development of guidelines to support EE best practices, including  an Energy Efficiency Technology Assessment; International Best Practices for Energy Efficiency Building Codes; a Green Hotels Rating Scheme for the Pacific; a Green Commercial Buildings Rating Scheme for the Pacific; Energy Efficiency Assessment Guidelines, Framework and Scorecard; and EE Guidelines for Hotels, Commercial Buildings and Street Lighting.

·         Conduct of a comprehensive energy audit training in all five PDMCs, which included intermediate and advanced energy auditing, practical on-site training and preparation of Investment Grade Audit Reports.

·         Preparation of a series of “Energy Saving Tips” for printing on the back of electricity bills and “Home Energy Guides” providing information on electricity costs for common electrical appliances (both efficient and inefficient) customized to each PDMC.

The PEEP2 guidelines, templates and implementation models would be suitable for scaling up EE implementation throughout the Pacific region.


Table:  Project Cost and Savings by Country

Country

Cost of Equipment (US$)

Cost of Installation (US$)

Total Cost (US$)

Annual Energy Savings (kWh/year)

Annual Energy Cost Savings (US$/year)

Annual Diesel Savings (litres/year)

Annual CO2 Savings (tCO2e/year)

Cook Islands

   616,582

148,780

765,362

      525,223

        320,386

     153,312

             471

PNG

   316,978

179,851

496,829

      428,384

        122,518

     108,190

             685

Samoa

   349,895

170,409

520,304

      919,381

        413,550

     250,987

             711

Tonga

   261,478

136,534

398,012

      638,924

        230,013

     109,973

             582

Vanuatu

   311,950

138,181

450,131

      864,595

        433,162

     249,001

             706

All **

     55,599

-

55,599

                -   

                   -   

                -   

                -   

Total

1,912,482

773,755

2,686,237

  3,376,507

     1,519,629

     871,463

          3,204

** Lamp Waste Treatment Equipment

 

Project Summary by Country

·         Cook Islands

                                                                                                                                   

Project

Energy Efficient    Technology

Total Project Cost                     (US$)

Annual Energy Savings      (MWh)

Annual GHG Reductions (tCO2e)

Average   Tariff       (US$/kWh)

Annual Energy Cost Savings         (US$)

Lifetime Energy Savings         (MWh)

Lifetime GHG Reductions (tCO2e)

Cost Per Lifetime Saving (US$/

kWh)

Cost/Lifetime GHG Saving (US$/

tCO2e)

Simple       Payback         (Years)

EE Lighting in Airport

Solar LED

36,520

8.2

6.7

0.61

4,972

163

134

0.22

273

7.3

EE Lighting in Market **

Solar LED

108,510

7.3

6.6

0.61

4,423

145

132

0.75

822

24.5

Refrigerator Program

Efficient Fridge/Freezers

113,150

83.3

66.4

0.61

50,803

833

664

0.14

170

2.2

EE Lighting in Port **

Solar LED

108,125

8.6

6.9

0.61

5,267

173

138

0.63

784

20.5

EE Measures in the Public Buildings

T-5 Lamps

121,080

197.0

176.0

0.61

120,140

1,970

1,760

0.06

69

1.0

EE in Hotels and Commercial Buildings

Inverter Acs, Insulation

148,808

57.6

94.9

0.61

35,128

576

949

0.26

157

4.2

EE Lighting in Residential Sector

T-5 Lamps

72,331

141.8

95.0

0.61

86,498

2,836

1,900

0.03

38

0.8

EE Street Lighting in Outer Islands

LED Street Lights

24,410

4.7

4.0

0.61

2,855

35

30

0.70

814

8.6

EE Measures in the Hospital

Solar Water Heaters

32,428

16.9

14.0

0.61

10,302

169

140

0.19

232

3.1

Totals

765,362

525

471

N/A

320,386

6,899

5,847

0.11

131

2.4

** Scope was higher than base case

·        Papua New Guinea

                                                                                   

Project

Energy Efficient    Technology

Total Project Cost                     (US$)

Annual Energy Savings      (MWh)

Annual GHG Reductions (tCO2e)

Average   Tariff       (US$/kWh)

Annual Energy Cost Savings         (US$)

Lifetime Energy Savings         (MWh)

Lifetime GHG Reductions (tCO2e)

Cost Per Lifetime Saving (US$/

kWh)

Cost/Lifetime GHG Saving (US$/

tCO2e)

Simple       Payback         (Years)

EE Street Lighting

LED Street Lighting

63 ,899

36.7

26.5

0.286

10,490

275

199

0.23

322

6.1

EE Lighting in Government Sector

T-5 Lamps

174 ,428

218.2

535.0

0.286

62,402

2,182

5,350

0.08

33

2.8

EE Street Lighting

LED Street Lighting

85 ,800

46.0

45.0

0.286

13,163

345

338

0.25

254

6.5

EE Lighting in Hospital

T-5 Lamps and sensors

87 ,817

43.9

27.0

0.286

12,557

439

270

0.20

325

7.0

EE Lighting in Government Sector

T-5 Lamps and sensors

84 ,885

83.6

51.0

0.286

23,906

836

510

0.10

166

3.6

Totals

496,829

428

685

N/A

122,518

4,077

6,666

0.12

75

4.1

·        Samoa

                                                                                                               

Project

Energy Efficient    Technology

Total Project Cost                     (US$)

Annual Energy Savings      (MWh)

Annual GHG Reductions (tCO2e)

Average   Tariff       (US$/kWh)

Annual Energy Cost Savings         (US$)

Lifetime Energy Savings         (MWh)

Lifetime GHG Reductions (tCO2e)

Cost Per Lifetime Saving (US$/

kWh)

Cost/Lifetime GHG Saving (US$/

tCO2e)

Simple       Payback         (Years)

EE Street Lighting

LED Street Lights

114,222

45.0

36.2

0.45

20,250

338

272

0.34

421

5.6

EE Lighting in Government Buildings

T-5 Lamps

50,124

406.0

324.7

0.45

182,700

2,761

2,208

0.02

23

0.3

EE Luminaires in Government Buildings

T-5 Luminaires

93,438

86.0

68.1

0.45

38,700

860

681

0.11

137

2.4

Air Conditioning - Government Buildings

Inverter A/Cs

88,435

80.0

77.3

0.45

36,000

800

773

0.11

114

2.5

Solar Hybrid A/C

Smart Controllers

EE Lighting in Commercial Buildings

T-5 Lamps

71,440

127.0

101.9

0.45

57,150

864

693

0.08

103

1.3

Air Conditioning -    Hotels

Inverter A/Cs

33,610

20.0

15.8

0.45

9,000

200

158

0.17

213

3.7

EE Lighting in Households

T-5 Lamps

69,035

155.0

123.6

0.45

69,750

3,100

2,472

0.02

28

1.0

Totals

520,304

919

711

N/A

413,550

8,922

7,256

0.06

72

1.3

·           Tonga

                                                                                   

Project

Energy Efficient    Technology

Total Project Cost                     (US$)

Annual Energy Savings      (MWh)

Annual GHG Reductions (tCO2e)

Average   Tariff       (US$/kWh)

Annual Energy Cost Savings         (US$)

Lifetime Energy Savings         (MWh)

Lifetime GHG Reductions (tCO2e)

Cost Per Lifetime Saving (US$/

kWh)

Cost/Lifetime GHG Saving (US$/

tCO2e)

Simple       Payback         (Years)

EE Street Lighting for Outer Islands

LED Street Lights

90 ,968

45.2

41.0

0.36

16,268

339

308

0.27

296

5.6

EE Street Lighting for Tongatapu

LED Street Lights

77 ,363

52.0

47.0

0.36

18,731

390

353

0.20

219

4.1

Residential EE Lighting in the Outer Islands

T-5 Lamps

83 ,939

233.5

213.0

0.36

84,072

4,671

4,260

0.02

20

1.0

EE Lighting in Public Sector Buildings

T-5 Lamps

71 ,783

158.7

144.7

0.36

57,134

1,587

1,447

0.05

50

1.3

Residential EE Lighting in Tongatapu

T-5 Lamps

73 ,958

149.5

136.0

0.36

53,808

2,989

2,720

0.02

27

1.4

Totals

398 , 012

639

582

N/A

230,013

9,976

9,087

0.04

44

1.7

·           Vanuatu

                                                                                                           

Project

Energy Efficient    Technology

Total Project Cost                     (US$)

Annual Energy Savings      (MWh)

Annual GHG Reductions (tCO2e)

Average   Tariff       (US$/kWh)

Annual Energy Cost Savings         (US$)

Lifetime Energy Savings         (MWh)

Lifetime GHG Reductions (tCO2e)

Cost Per Lifetime Saving (US$/

kWh)

Cost/Lifetime GHG Saving (US$/

tCO2e)

Simple       Payback         (Years)

EE Air Conditioning

VRF

68,673

14.4

11.5

0.501

7,214

144

115

0.48

597

9.5

EE Lighting in Public Sector Buildings

T-5, LED and CFLs

95,199

122.0

101.0

0.501

61,122

1,220

1,010

0.08

94

1.6

EE Street Lighting in Luganville

LED Street Lights

64,775

36.2

34.0

0.501

18,126

271

255

0.24

254

3.6

Residential EE Lighting, Luganville

T-5 Lamps

46,668

136.0

112.0

0.501

68,136

2,720

2,240

0.02

21

0.7

EE Street Lighting in Port Vila

LED Street Lights

65,575

46.0

24.0

0.501

23,054

345

180

0.19

364

2.8

Residential EE Lighting, Port Vila

T-5 Lamps

56,478

319.0

264.0

0.501

159,819

6,380

5,280

0.01

11

0.4

EE Lighting for Provincial Buildings and Schools

T-5 Lamps

52,763

191.0

159.0

0.501

95,691

1,910

1,590

0.03

33

0.6

Totals

450,131

865

706

N/A

433,162

12,990

10,670

0.03

42

1.0


Through your kind contribution of $50, $100, $250, $500, or even $1000, you can help us raise the $10,000 needed to build the well in the next 3-6 months and you can be part of this very real community effort that will positively impact every person in Mapintade. read more...

IIEC Knowledge Products